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Assessing the effects of land tenure on urban developments in Kampala  Published

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Assessing the effects of land tenure on urban developments in Kampala

Kampala exbibits informal urban expansion typical of cities in sub-Saharan Africa.  Of note about Kampala's urbanization process is the extent of informality estimated to comprise about 60% of all urban developments.  Though there exists a diversity of circumstances and factors that contribute to informal urban developments, this study focused on land tenure considered key in land development because being the rules underlying a people's relation to land, rules of tenure define rights to land, how these rights are accessed and even influence developments put on land depending on the security accorded to land rights.  This study assessed the effect rules of tenure have on urban developments in Kampala by examining land access, land subdivision and land development processes (considered the three stages where informality can occur) in the land and property development process.

Better Growth, Better Cities Achieving Uganda's Development Ambition  Published

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Better Growth, Better Cities - Achieving Uganda's Development Ambition.pdf

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Better Growth, Better Cities   Achieving Uganda's Development Ambition

Uganda’s urban population is currently just over 6 million, and growing at 5% a year. By 2040, the country’s totalurban population could reach 20 million.

Successfully managing the ongoing process of urbanisation will be a required condition for Uganda to become anupper middle-income country, as part of achieving its Vision 2040 agenda. However, as the country looks to deliveron its development commitments in the National Development Plan II (NDPII) by 2020, Uganda faces a numberof immediate urban challenges. Historically, as high-income countries have developed, economic development hashappened simultaneously with urbanisation. Yet in Uganda, like elsewhere in Africa, this relationship has largelybroken down – “urbanisation without growth”. In addressing this imbalance, our analysis suggests that improvedurban policy is not enough – correcting ongoing issues in the economy will be just as important for a successfulurban transition.

Effects of Land Tenure on Physical Planning in Uganda A Case of Kampala City  Published Popular

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Effects of Land Tenure on Physical Planning in Uganda- A Case of Kampala City.pdf

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Effects of Land Tenure on Physical Planning in Uganda  A Case of Kampala City

There are different land tenure systems in Kampala city with competing legitimacy claims under the different systems. Despite the laws and regulations put in place to guide and regulate physical planning, planned developments continue to co-exist with informal and illegal developments and the situation seems to vary from one tenure system to another.

Exploring livelihoods of the urban poor in Kampala, Uganda  Published

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Esxploring livelihoods of the urban poor in Kampala, Uganda.pdf

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Exploring livelihoods of the urban poor in Kampala, Uganda

The urban poor in Kampala, Uganda represent a large portion of the population of the capital city, yet little isdocumented about their livelihoods. The main objective of this study was to gain of the livelihoods present amongst the population of the urban poor and the context in considered which exist, so as to form a foundation for future programming.

Globalization and the Challenge of Urban Development in Uganda  Published

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Globalization and the Challenge of Urban Development in Uganda.pdf

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Globalization and the Challenge of Urban Development in Uganda

This study is concerned with the challenges of urban planning in Kampala, the capital city of Uganda, in the era of economic globalization.  The emergence of the global economy, an important facet of globalization, has radically transformed urban landscapes around the world.  It has increased urban populations (Zetter and Hamza, 2004), restructured the political economy of cities through decentralization (Frobel, et. al., 1980), created economic opportunities for some while impoverishing others, and changed the nature of urban development policies around the world.

Housing, Urbanization and Land rights in Uganda, 2016  Published

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Housing, Urbanization and Land rights in Uganda, 2016.pdf

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Housing, Urbanization and Land rights in Uganda, 2016

THE COUNTRY IS FACING A GROWING HOUSING CHALLENGE.  The population is growing much faster than the rate of housing supply.  The country’s population increased from 24.2 million in 2002 to 34.9 million in 2015 (UBOS, 2015).  Uganda’s annual population growth rate is among the highest in the world, standing at 3.25% in 2014 (World Bank, 2015a).  The Second NationalDevelopment Plan (NDP II) projects Uganda will need roughly 12.6 million new housing units in the next thirty years and estimates a deficit of roughly 4 million over that time (GoUa, 2015).

Introducing Sustainable Urban Transport a case of Kampala, Uganda  Published

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Introducing Sustainable Urban Transport- a case of Kampala, Uganda.pdf

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Introducing Sustainable Urban Transport  a case of Kampala, Uganda

This report is the result of a joint study done by Robin van der Griend and Wytse Siemonsma, both Traffi cManagement students at the NHTV University of Applied Sciences in Breda.  The reason for our cooperation is because we believe in the strength of combining our individual qualities , and to make it possible to approach the subject in a broader perspective.

Kampala city Stimulus paper  Published

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Kampala city - Stimulus paper.pdf

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Kampala city   Stimulus paper

Kampala City has evolved from a small town of 8 km2 through a “City of Seven hills” at independence in 1962 to one of the fastest growing cities in Africa.  Today Kampala City occupies more than twenty five hills that include Makerere Hill on which the country's biggest and oldest university is located (Kibirige, 2006).  The hills have steep slopes separated by wide valleys.  The city derives its name from the land of “Impala” (antelope) that roamed the area before it was taken over for human settlement.  The first administrative post was set up at Old Kampala Hill by Lord Lugard (British Administrator) in 1890 covering an area of 0.68 km2.  It was gazetted into a town council in 1906 with an area of 8 km2 and was extended to cover an area of approximately 195 km2 in 1968.

Land tenure considerations for neighbourhood planning  Published

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Land tenure considerations for neighbourhood planning.pdf

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Land tenure considerations for neighbourhood planning

The land tenure regime in Uganda is considered to be one of the most complex in the world, particularly in Kampala where four different land tenure systems operate alongside each other.  This has had a significant impact on growth and investments in the city.  It has also made planning more challenging.  However, land use planning is important to be able to co-ordinate the private and public investments and thus to enable productive and liveable density in cities.  Furthermore, well-functioning urban areas require that economies of scope and complementarities be leveraged in the provision of physical infrastructure like roads, drainage, street lighting, electricity, water, sewerage, and waste disposal, as well as policing and health care. With foresight and strong implementation, urban planning can provide the coordination required between various public and private sector actors.

Land Use and TRansport Planning in the Greater Kampala, Uganda  Published

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Land Use and TRansport Planning in the Greater Kampala, Uganda.pdf

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Land Use and TRansport Planning in the Greater Kampala, Uganda

Urban land use (also known as spatial planning or urban form) has a big influence and impact on the way transport systems are planned and managed in large cities.  In Kampala, for example, transport systems are largely inefficient because of the failure by the city authorities to adopt an integrated approach towards land use and transport planning.  Due to a multifarious and complex land tenure system, the provision of roads and other transport-related infrastructure such as parking facilities and bus terminals has become virtually impossible.

Linking environmental assessment and rapid urbanization in Kampala City  Published

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Linking environmental assessment and rapid urbanization in Kampala City.pdf

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Linking environmental assessment and rapid urbanization in Kampala City

Linking environmental assessment (EA) and infrastructure development projects as a result of rapid urbanization reveals serious environmental problems in Kampala City, Uganda.  Of the many infrastructure development projects implemented to meet the growing demands of rural–urban influx, few are subjected to EA as part of the project approval process.  This paper investigates the environmental impacts of infrastructure development projects that are implemented and seeks to understand the nature of these impacts.

More Revenue Mobilization by Strengthening Land Administration in Kampala  Published

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More Revenue Mobilization by Strengthening Land Administration in Kampala.pdf

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More Revenue Mobilization by Strengthening Land Administration in Kampala

Kampala has complicated land tenure systems.  Land is held under customary, freehold, leasehold and mailo tenure systems.  There is a high prevalence of informal land transactions.  Parts of Kampala are poorly planned negatively impacting on property values, expansion of infrastructure and hence attracting low revenue from property taxes.

Negotiated Planning Breaking the implementation impasse in Kampala  Published

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Negotiated Planning - Breaking the implementation impasse in Kampala.pdf

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Negotiated Planning   Breaking the implementation impasse in Kampala

In Kampala, Uganda’s capital, land tenure arrangements are among the most complex inthe world: intensified by one of the highest rates of urbanization (over 5%). Attempts by the Ugandan government to administer land have typically relied upon formal cadastral systems, which have been powerless to disentangle the webs of layered and competing land tenure arrangements.  Proposed developments all over the city have stalled, completely crippled by seemingly unresolvable land wrangles.

Overview of the Housing Industry and Housing Finance Sector in Uganda  Published

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Overview of the Housing Industry and Housing Finance Sector in Uganda.pdf

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Overview of the Housing Industry and Housing Finance Sector in Uganda

Uganda’s housing finance sector has registered commendable growth rates and transformation during the last two decades. By the end of December 2010, the total mortgage portfolio was estimated at UGX 1.65 trillion or USD 660 million (4.8 percent of GDP), compared to UGX 771 billion (USD 308.4 million) in 2009 (3.3 percent of GDP) and UGX 32.4 billion (USD 12.9 million) in 2002 (0.3 percent of GDP).

Population, urban development and the environment in Uganda: The case of Kampala city and its environs  Published

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Population, urban development and the environment in Uganda - The case of Kampala city and its environs.pdf

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Population, urban development and the environment in Uganda: The case of Kampala city and its environs

Uganda is experiencing rapid urbanization estimated at an annual growth rate of 5.5% where Kampala has remained a primate city since 1969 growing at annual rate of 5.61%.  With this growth rate, Kampala absorbs 40% of the national urban population and 4.9% of the national population (UBOS, 2002).  Kampala’s growth and development is characterized by the sprawl into hitherto rural areas engulfing formerly satellite towns within a radius of 32 kilometers.

Potential for tenure responsive land use planning in Kampala  Published

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Potential for tenure-responsive land use planning in Kampala.pdf

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Potential for tenure responsive land use planning in Kampala

Kampala is a city that is growing rapidly at an estimated rate of 3.9% per year.  It is estimated that the daily workforce comprises of 4.5 million people.  To date, much of this urbanisation has been unplanned.  There have been various attempts at designing a planning framework.  In 2012, the Kampala Physical Development Plan (KPDP) was finalised.

Situation Analysis of Informal Settlements in Kampala  Published

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Situation Analysis of Informal Settlements in Kampala.pdf

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Situation Analysis of Informal Settlements in Kampala

Kampala is both the administrative and commercial capital city of Uganda situated on about 24 low hills that are surrounded by wetland valleys, characterizedby an imprint of scattered unplanned settlements.  This urban form is attributed to the dualism, which arose between the local Kibuga and Kampala Township or Municipality.

The Evolution of Town Planning Ideas, Plans and their Implementation in Kampala City 1903 2004  Published

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The Evolution of Town Planning Ideas, Plans and their Implementation in Kampala City 1903-2004.pdf

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The Evolution of Town Planning Ideas, Plans and their Implementation in Kampala City 1903 2004

Through a descriptive and exploratory approach, and by review and deduction ofarchival and documentary resources, supplemented by empirical evidence from casestudies, this thesis traces, analyses and describes the historic trajectory of planningevents in Kampala City, Uganda, since the inception of modern town planning in1903, and runs through the various planning episodes of 1912, 1919, 1930, 1951,1972 and 1994. The planning ideas at interplay in each planning period and theirexpression in planning schemes vis-à-vis spatial outcomes form the major focus.

The Land Market in Kampala, Uganda and its effect on Settlement Patterns  Published Popular

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The Land Market in Kampala, Uganda and its effect on Settlement Patterns.pdf

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The Land Market in Kampala, Uganda and its effect on Settlement Patterns

This study assesses the land market in Kampala, Uganda in order to better understand the extent to which land is a constraint to development and particularly to the development of housing for the majority of residents of Kampala.  The International Housing Coalition (IHC) sponsored the study.  Mr.Stephen Giddings, an IHC consultant and a former senior USAID official, prepared this report.  The paper was presented at a networking session of the World Urban Forum IV held in Nanjing, China in November 2008.  Both the paper and the IHC’s participation in the World Urban Forum IV were funded by the Reaume Foundation.  The IHC greatly appreciates the support of the Reaume Foundation.

The Political ecology of unplanned land use changes in Kampala city, Uganda  Published Popular

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The Political ecology of unplanned land use changes in Kampala city, Uganda.pdf

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The Political ecology of unplanned land use changes in Kampala city, Uganda

Kampala City is undergoing massive unplanned urban land use changes caused by political, social, economic and environmental push and pull factors.  Both local and transnational companies are rapidly locating in Kampala due to its emerging markets for produced goods and services, cheap labor costs, tax holidays offered by the government to encourage foreign investments and other economies of scale.  Furthermore, rural-urban migration and high birthrates result in rapid urban population growth which influences the land use in the area.  Increasing demand for urban land has led to land scarcity and maximum utilization of any available land.